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Category Archives: Negotiation

Leaders and conflict

As we saw yesterday, the great early 20th century management thinker Mary Parker Follett was a pioneer in the innovative and constructive use of conflict in organizations. She believed they should be resolved by neither domination nor compromise, but rather by integration. However, she was fully aware of the potential obstacles to its use. A principle one is the presence in a situation of a strong individual leader. . .

Integrating conflict

As we have noted, conflict causes great stress for many managers, whether it is resolved through domination or compromise. But the great early 20th century management thinker Mary Parker Follett argued that there is a vastly superior way to treat the issue. . .

Just business

Remember that saying from the old mafia movies? Both sides knew and accepted that events had developed to the point where one wiseguy was going to have to deal with another. Nothing personal. Just business. Over the past two days we have reviewed the preparation and conduct of a negotiation that popped up regarding the organization of a prominent speaker’s inclusion at a conference. . .

Personality, professionalism, and presentation

I mentioned yesterday the events leading up to a negotiation I witnessed earlier this month. It involved a man who wanted to take over control and credit for organization of an event that a woman, on proper authority, had already been busily arranging. The man resisted having a meeting about it, since doing so would have constituted an acknowledgment that he lacked the standing in the issue that he claimed for himself. The woman nevertheless managed, with personal tact and professional focus, to obtain his agreement to attend. . .

Professionalism, personality, and preparation

I recently observed a very peculiar negotiation. One of the parties, a woman, had been asked to organize an event for a leading expert in her field. The other, a man and a local figure of sorts in that field, wanted to step in, have the woman announce publicly that he was fully or partially responsible for work that he had not done, and then dominate the event itself. . .