Skip to content

Category Archives: Conflict

Roundup: Lessons from every quarter

Advice for effective management has been showing up in some of the most unlikely places over the past several weeks, or in unexpected guises. Let’s take a look at some of these, leavened with some real advice from some of the best management trainers around. . .

White lies

Have you ever negotiated with someone – a potential customer or partner, a boss or colleague – who just can’t bear to say “no?” Desperate to avert an unpleasant confrontation, not wanting to hurt your feelings, and struggling to evade personal responsibility for either of these, this person instead expresses admiration for your plans and support for your proposals. So off you go, busily filling in details, mobilizing resources, and preparing for implementation. But when you return to your negotiating partner . . .

Creative collisions

In the midst of political campaigns – particularly long and arduous ones such as the presidential race now drawing to a close in the United States – it can become difficult to keep our perspective. We all know that similarly distorting and disorienting political dynamics can disturb our clarity at work, as well. . .

Leaders and conflict

As we saw yesterday, the great early 20th century management thinker Mary Parker Follett was a pioneer in the innovative and constructive use of conflict in organizations. She believed they should be resolved by neither domination nor compromise, but rather by integration. However, she was fully aware of the potential obstacles to its use. A principle one is the presence in a situation of a strong individual leader. . .

Integrating conflict

As we have noted, conflict causes great stress for many managers, whether it is resolved through domination or compromise. But the great early 20th century management thinker Mary Parker Follett argued that there is a vastly superior way to treat the issue. . .