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Category Archives: Book Reviews

Book Review: Resurrecting the Street

We tend to look in specific places for specific characteristics – to entrepreneurs for innovation, the military for courage and resolution, firefighters and police for unflinching service, to government for stability in crisis, and in particular to politicians for astute direction in the midst of disorder. It’s normal enough. It is better to think of these characteristics, though . . .

Book Review: Traction

Traction – an apt and reassuring title for one of an increasingly rare breed of truly satisfying and rewarding management books. Gino Wickman’s “Traction: Get a Grip on Your Business” aims to help the owners and managers of a small business to formulate a concrete, actionable picture of the business, and then to use that to develop equally concrete action to create more productive and profitable pictures with each forward step – generate traction to move forward into a position affording new and greater traction. Who doesn’t want to feel they have such a profound understanding of and contact with the reality that drives their business?

Book Review: The No Asshole Rule

I once heard a company commander in the Marines criticize a then-common means of dealing with individuals who were chronic discipline problems: arrange for their reassignment to someone else’s unit. “I don’t transfer problems,” he said with a resolute determination that brooked no argument. “I fix them.” I was impressed by that, and inclined to follow his highly responsible sounding no-excuses attitude. But I later learned that he was mostly wrong . . .

Book Review: Acting Up Brings Everyone Down

The question of how negative individual behavior affects the workplace has received considerable attention over the past few years. And it’s good that it should do so, for at least two reasons. . .

Book Review: Innovation: Need of the Hour

Sramana Mitra is a successful businesswoman who has developed specific and focused ideas on how entrepreneurs can improve their chances, how this can help the economy, and how the economy itself might better be structured to encourage this worthwhile outcome. She promotes this thinking through her consulting, and then spins her carefully organized observations into a series of wonderful books on the theme. We have looked at two of these . . .